Jetlagged  

Posted by inkstainedhands in

This is Hannah Rozenblat, reporting to you live from an apartment in Maalot Dafna, where she is fortunate enough to have wireless internet -- although she would have trouble answering if you asked whose internet she connected to.

I want to let everyone know that I arrived safely in Israel, baruch Hashem, and we got all of our luggage just as we sent it.

I feel as though I woke up only a few hours ago, finished packing (and stressing because my carry-on bag, which was supposed to be 17 pounds or less, was a full 25), and waited for the car service to pick us up. (Our driver, an Italian man, entertained us the entire way with stories of how his friends toured with Donna Summer and how he met her backstage, as well as how he met James Brown when he was serving in the army.)

But so much time has passed since then, and I got absolutely no sleep from the time I woke up. My watch is still telling me what time it is in New York; it is past 4 AM. Here in Israel though it is a bit past 11 AM. The sun is bright (and overwhelmingly hot) and there are kids playing outside -- not the right atmosphere for sleeping.

I did not want to sleep during the flight, so I actually spent my time productively. I read, I wrote, I listened to music, and I did a lot of eating (if that can be called productive). The food on the flight was actually much better than I expected it to be, and much better than my friends told me to expect it to be.

I took many random pictures on the flight, but my USB cord is in one of the suitcases, and they have not yet been unpacked. We just got here an hour ago or so, and are just settling in. I feel a bit tired, but as the local grocery market closes on Tuesdays before 2 PM, we need to go there before allowing ourselves to crash.

Oh, and it seems my mother has just found the USB cable! But the internet here is too slow for me to upload any photos at the moment. Oh well.

I feel like this will be one of those posts that I just look back on and think, "Hannah, you should have seriously gotten some sleep before posting, because you are barely coherent!" So if I sound a bit off, you know I have a good excuse.

This entry was posted on Tuesday, August 4, 2009 at Tuesday, August 04, 2009 and is filed under . You can follow any responses to this entry through the comments feed .

8 comments

The sun, in any part of Israel, is never "overwhelmingly" hot. That sounds disparaging towards the natural weather in G-d's land (and in this case, G-d's city). The standards in Israel determine what's correct (see last daf of ketubot).

August 4, 2009 at 2:57 PM

The "natural" weather in G-d's land is not the way it was intended to be while we don't have the Bait Hamikdash.

August 5, 2009 at 1:21 AM

...? I'm not sure what you mean Sophie; as far as I understand the beit ha'mikdash hasn't, and ptentially won't, change the natural weather in Jerusalem, Israel or any other part of the middle east.

(Though in the distant past the middle east, and Israel in particular, were much less arid.)

(Ha. Word verification is "Prizi", one of the peoples whom G-d has drove out of His land to make way for His people.)

August 5, 2009 at 1:41 AM

*ahem*, "driven" out.

August 5, 2009 at 1:42 AM

As Sophie said, the weather I have been experiencing the past few days in Israel is not the weather that G-d's land was meant to have.

There are many instances in the Torah of the weather and the conditions of the land depending on the behavior of the Jewish people. The land can either be a good one, when the Jews are the way they are supposed to be, or it can be a difficult place to live in when the Jews are not keeping the Torah as they should.

The land can either be a bracha or a klala.

So I stand by my original statement. The sun felt overwhelming to me. And I don't see how this can be the 'natural weather' that Israel is supposed to have, and I don't see how it can possibly be 'correct' while we as a nation have not merited the rebuilding of the Beit Hamikdash.

August 8, 2009 at 5:39 PM

"..the weather I have been experiencing the past few days in Israel is not the weather that G-d's land was meant to have"- What weather then?

"There are many instances in the Torah of the weather and the conditions of the land depending on the behavior of the Jewish people"- Well, it's really just the rain (i.e. food, sustenance) and wars. G-d never said "If you're really good the winters and the summers will all be like spring!"

"The sun felt overwhelming to me"- Israel is actually quite temperate compared to countries south of it (like Yemen) or in other parts of the middle east and Africa. Anyway, at least it's not humid and muggy like the city despised by G-d (NYC).

"I don't see how it can possibly be 'correct' while we as a nation have not merited the rebuilding of the Beit Hamikdash"- I don't think the Beit Hamikdash is going to have a big effect on the weather (sorry to burst your bubble). Even while the second temple stood in it's glory there were droughts and other ills, for which we had to beseech our G-d.

Anyway, I don't feel the fact that the temple does not stand today represents such an "incorrectness" on our part. I mean 1) things have been moving at a quick pace to hasten our redemtion, and 2) even during the days of Rabbi Akiva there was no temple. Surely his generation would have merited one...

August 8, 2009 at 11:14 PM

"Anyway, at least it's not humid and muggy like the city despised by G-d (NYC)." -- Wouldn't that be San Francisco or Las Vegas or something?

And whatever you say, I do not believe that the weather Israel has now is the same thing it had when the Jews came up there from Egypt, nor is it the same that we will experience once the Beit HaMikdash is rebuilt.

Wait and see, I suppose.

August 10, 2009 at 3:04 PM

Yes, G-d hates all three of those cities (though there are upright people in all of them).

Listen, the Rambam is of the opinion that nothing in the physical world will change when "mashiach comes" except our national "servitude to the nations" (i.e. we'll gain full political freedom). The eastern European rabbis attributed a lot of supernatural ideas to mashiach because they've been putting up with stuff so long tat they want something big (to put it concisely). The weather, according to him, will not change at all with the coming of the redemptive era not in Israel and not anywhere (aside from the effects of natural occurrences and human activity).

The weather in Israel in the past, like I said, has changed dramatically both due to natural occurrences and man made occurrences. As we see from he stories of David both Syrian bears and lions once roamed in the holy land. In general it was greener and more rainy and would be a little more similar perhaps to the Ethiopia of today.

August 10, 2009 at 4:03 PM

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